Blogs 4 Brownback

February 5, 2008

Are the Jihadists Like the WWII Era Japs?

Filed under: Defending America,History,Terrorism — Psycheout @ 12:11 am
Tags: , , ,

KamikazeI was recently watching a WWII documentary and learned something new. Don’t laugh, libtards. Kamikaze is a compound word made up of “kami” meaning god and “kaze” meaning wind. So a kamikaze is a wind god means “wind of god” or “divine wind”. OK, so what, right? The Japanese were nutters, right?

But it turns out that towards the end of the Pacific war that the Nips began using suicide bombings, crashing planes into American ships (but mostly hitting the water), for the same reason as the terrorists who want to kill us. And, most importantly, they started using these tactics when they knew that defeat was close at hand.

The Japanese pilots, whose planes were filled to the brim with explosives, were told that there was a special place in Heaven for those who took out as many American servicemen as possible when they crashed their planes into United States Navy ships, taking their own lives (a sin) and killing innocent and noble American boys (yet another sin) in an act of barbarous cowardice.

Atomic ExplosionNow, how is that different from Islamic extremist homicide bombers who are told by their leaders (who, ironically, don’t have the courage or dignity to actually suicide themselves) that they will be rewarded in the afterlife with scores of virgins (yeah, right) if they kill as many “infidels” (us) on their way out in a dramatic display of pyrotechnics?

Well, there’s not much difference, is there?

Atomic ExplosionNow, how did we solve the problem we had with the unreasonable Japanese terrorists over 60 years ago? Diplomacy? Surrender? Hugs? Foreign aid (bribes)? Rounds of kum-ba-ya? No. We defeated them, utterly. We destroyed them, completely. We showed absolutely no mercy. We bravely dropped the two newly developed atomic bombs, ultimately saving millions of lives. That’s what America does. An invasion of Japan would have been wholesale slaughter on both sides. We knew that, so we found another way. We cherish life, unlike the savages we are up against.

Rising SunAre the Japanese our enemies today? No! They are one of our strongest allies in Asia today, ever since they realized that the evil conquest of the world is wrong, and America is a beacon of hope and freedom. And they have remained so to this day, ever since we proved to them that we are not weak, that we will never surrender. The Japanese, like the Islamofascists, despise weakness. We must show them our strength, or forever be a target of their villainy.

Bataan Death MarchBack in the Pacific war, American captives taken by the Japanese were starved, tortured and butchered. See any parallel? Daniel Berg, perhaps? So the answer is clear. We must learn from the past and apply its lessons. If not, we are doomed to failure.

Total surrender. Total destruction. Total victory. Submit or die.

After we have completely defeated the muzzies, they will be our allies, just like Japan and Germany (remember Dresden?). We will be fast and eternal friends, even if their religion is a sin against G-d. But their ultimate fate is for our Father in Heaven to judge.

Internment CampThe only thing missing is the Muslim internment camps. We need to get serious about winning this war at home and abroad. Leaving the Islamofascists to run about free in our homeland is asking for trouble. Make no mistake about it. History does not lie. And we need to make sure that there’s plenty of room for the fifth column, the far left who would gladly make common cause with the terrorists. It’s what must be done.

It’s called tough love, folks. And it works. Time and again. Learn some history, and try to prove me wrong. I am right. There’s no denying that.

Update: In the comments, Dio Brando complained about the translation of kamikaze. Kami by itself does indeed mean god, spirit or divinity. But in the context of the word kamikaze, “divine wind” is a more common translation. Now try to refute the substance of my argument, picky-san.

Update 2: Crashing passenger planes laden with fuel into the World Trade Center and Pentagon were suicide attacks, very similar to the kamikaze attacks of WWII, were they not?

— Psycheout

44 Comments »

  1. “So a kamikaze is a wind god.”

    No, genius. It means “divine wind”. Kami=divine, kaze=wind. “The divine wind guides me, strengthens me, helps me”.

    Kunio Yamashita (parental advisory)

    Copypasta that.

    Chapter II: The Effects of the Atomic Bombings

    That too. Also note that we killed a few of our own soldiers(POWs at the time), a bunch of our own citizens, and thousands of innocent people(students, christians, babies, mothers, businessmen, fathers, elderly, etc.).

    You see, you may not know this in your little boarded-up home, but the overwhelming majority of the people responsible for both the bomb and the bombing have come to condemn it. It’s why we want to avoid a nuclear war at all costs. Sure, go ahead and bomb the whole of the middle east. Hope you don’t mind bombing Jerusalem as well, or any biblical area of great importance. I hope God pities you for slaughtering millions in the His name.

    You should be ashamed to call yourself a “Christian”. Loving and worshiping God is NOT about killing whoever does not follow exactly what you believe. I seriously doubt you yourself follow all of the Bible to the letter– assuming you even understand it! And if you do, I feel sorry for any sons stoned to death, or daughters sold into slavery.

    [Ed Note: Please learn to embed your links. Thanks.]

    Comment by Dio Brando — February 5, 2008 @ 1:15 am | Reply

  2. But it was so cute as a long string. ;_;

    Comment by Dio Brando — February 5, 2008 @ 2:28 am | Reply

  3. The bible is for faggots.

    Comment by The Nobody — February 5, 2008 @ 5:55 am | Reply

  4. “Update 2: Crashing passenger planes laden with fuel into the World Trade Center and Pentagon were suicide attacks, very similar to the kamikaze attacks of WWII, were they not?”

    Actually, no. The Japanese pilots were soldiers following the orders of their superior officers. The ones that crashed into the world trade center were terrorists and criminals. The Japanese used their own military planes and even built specially designed planes (or gliders) that were little more than bombs with wings to carry out their suicide missions. The terrorists stole planes from civilian airlines to carry out their attacks. What the Japanese did was an act of war. The WTC attack was an act of terrorism and a crime against mankind itself. So, no, the two were not the same thing.

    Comment by Arn — February 5, 2008 @ 6:56 am | Reply

  5. First of all, a bit of history for everyone. In 1274 and again in 1281 the Mongols, who ruled most of East Asia – including China – at the time, tried to invade Japan. Both times their assaults were turned back, in large part due to violent weather in the Sea of Japan. This is were the Japanese legend of the “Kamakazi (divine wind)” that protects the islands originated.

    “The Japanese pilots, whose planes were filled to the brim with explosives, were told that there was a special place in Heaven for those who took out as many American servicemen as possible when they crashed their planes into United States Navy ships, taking their own lives (a sin) and killing innocent and noble American boys (yet another sin) in an act of barbarous cowardice.”

    The “military culture” of the Japanese of that time taught that there was no higher honor than serving one country – and, if neccessary, dying for it: this was not something new that was made up just for the kamakazi pilots. “Innocent” American boys? – Well, of course I don’t wish any harm on American servicemen & women anytime, anywhere, anyhow, but there WAS a war on 7 they knew that they were heading for active combat, so your point there falls a bit flat.

    “And, most importantly, they started using these tactics when they knew that defeat was close at hand.”

    It wasn’t an act of; “we are going to lose, so lets take out as many as possible just for the hell of it”. It was one of; “this is our last chance to turn the war around back into our favor”.

    Comment by indyandy — February 5, 2008 @ 9:11 am | Reply

  6. Just a little not of interest, the Kamakazi pilots were the inspiration for the cruise missile. The terrible toll taken by the US Navy ships and the psychological effects on their crews were noted and the military wanted to use that same tool without losing an expensive pilot. Even ignoring the Kamakazi issue, the Japanese committed some seriously terrible acts such as the Rape of Nanjing, the beheading of US POWs after the Japanese surrender, the development and use of biological weapons, the organized and official use of rape of captured women as a recruitment tool for officer candidates, the use of slave labor, and the horrific conditions of their POW camps just to name a few off the top of my head. Granted, they viewed their Emperor as a living God, an entity worthy of any sacrifice, yet does that allow them to use any and all available means for their Imperial designs? Also interesting is how the Japanese imperial navy sent the Yamamoto and a group of destroyers on basically a Kamakazi attack against a US carrier fleet long after the US had secured complete control of the Pacific ocean, which resulted in 3000 Japanese Sailors dying for pretty much nothing. Did what they believe in, the ultimate sacrifice for their country, absolve them or at least make their terrible crimes committed against humanity understandable? If you say yes, then you have to agree that Bush should be absolved or at least understood for his conducting the War in Iraq since he must believe for whatever reason that the war was the right and just thing to do. Its a very slippery slope if we try to justice war crimes. My humble opinion, having spent two deployments (one for Afghanistan and another for Iraq) is that the US military, like military bodies around the world are not designed to occupy, police, and rebuild countries without any form of social order from within. To make a comparison to the US occupation with Japan post WWII, we would have had to keep Saddam in power and use his secret police and brutal government to maintain order, something I don’t think was a moral option in today’s world. We didn’t have to rebuild Japanese society from the ground up after the war as opposed to Iraq and Afghanistan which were barely functioning countries to begin with. Once again a fascinating topic to discuss.

    Comment by Diablo — February 5, 2008 @ 10:06 am | Reply

  7. Daiblo @ “To make a comparison to the US occupation with Japan post WWII, we would have had to keep Saddam in power and use his secret police and brutal government to maintain order, something I don’t think was a moral option in today’s world. We didn’t have to rebuild Japanese society from the ground up after the war as opposed to Iraq and Afghanistan which were barely functioning countries to begin with. Once again a fascinating topic to discuss.”

    The reason why Iraq and Afghanistan have had their problems is President Clinton undermined the reconstruction effort by with holding resources and demanding tie reconstruction be done on liberal, ideological lines. As the book “Emerald City” points out the American director of public health was appointed because he was an important Clinton contributor and a strong supporter of abortions for women. He spent most of his time pushing an anti-smoking campaign and medical co-payments when most Iraqis were dying of gunshot wounds and the Iraq hospitals were barely functioning. Iraq is just an example of how out of touch with reality liberalism is and why we need to elect an Republican in November to turn things around.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — February 5, 2008 @ 11:01 am | Reply

  8. Are the Jihadists like WWII Era Japs?

    Yes and no. They certainly do have the same kind of fanaticism. But they don´t have direct control over a country and thus don´t represent an easy target.

    At the same time, going suicidal is not a desperation tactic for them, but simply a normal modus operandi. Has something to do with martyrdom.

    taking their own lives (a sin) and killing innocent and noble American boys (yet another sin) in an act of barbarous cowardice.

    1. Soldiers in war, regardless of nation, are never innocent nor noble.
    2. Consciously doing something that will get you killed for something you believe in isn´t what I´d call cowardice.
    3. It´s not a sin in their religion. And who knows, theirs might be the right one under those thousands out there.

    Now, how did we solve the problem we had with the unreasonable Japanese terrorists over 60 years ago? Diplomacy? Surrender? Hugs? Foreign aid (bribes)? Rounds of kum-ba-ya? No. We defeated them, utterly. We destroyed them, completely. We showed absolutely no mercy. We bravely dropped the two newly developed atomic bombs, ultimately saving millions of lives. That’s what America does. An invasion of Japan would have been wholesale slaughter on both sides. We knew that, so we found another way. We cherish life, unlike the savages we are up against.

    That coming from the nation that routinely mass-murdered civilians via “strategic bombing” is pure and utter irony.

    Are the Japanese our enemies today? No! They are one of our strongest allies in Asia today, ever since they realized that the evil conquest of the world is wrong, and America is a beacon of hope and freedom.

    I doubt that most Japanese would call the US a beacon of hope and freedom. I really doubt it.

    The only thing missing is the Muslim internment camps. We need to get serious about winning this war at home and abroad. Leaving the Islamofascists to run about free in our homeland is asking for trouble. Make no mistake about it. History does not lie. And we need to make sure that there’s plenty of room for the fifth column, the far left who would gladly make common cause with the terrorists. It’s what must be done.

    The camps were a freakin joke. If they´d have been serious, you´d have had to intern the german-american population, too.

    Comment by PG — February 5, 2008 @ 1:33 pm | Reply

  9. True. Also the transition of the modern Japanese state from an Imperialist power was not exactly smooth. There was tremendous pressure placed on President Trueman and McCarthy to have the Emperor brought up on war crimes since basically everything was done in his name. Of course I am not saying he ordered the war crimes committed nor that he even had knowledge of them being committed. Notice that he was the only axis leader to survive the war. I am simply voicing my opinion that the necessary steps taken by the US military to transition the Japanese state from Imperialist to a non agressive state could not be accomplished today as many of them wouldn’t be politically correct or popular. No one in their right mind could defend how the President, Congress, and the American people sent us over there with not enough material, men, or the most vital, a clear mission. Its a complete mess and will continue to be so until something drastic happens. I blame Al Gore.

    Comment by Diablo — February 5, 2008 @ 1:37 pm | Reply

  10. Iraq is just an example of how out of touch with reality liberalism is and why we need to elect an Republican in November to turn things around.

    Either way you look at it, all that’s changed in Iraq is a greater separation of tribes/groups, and who’s doing the killing. The irony of Hussein is that his rule by fear actually kept the whole of the country united.

    The thing to focus on? Iraq isn’t a country in a traditional sense. It’s an area composed of numerous tribes and religious sects(Sunni, Shi’a, Kurd, etc.). Although the idea behind liberating Iraq was fine(at least, assuming it wasn’t for anything BUT liberation), it took us away from the hunt for Bin Laden, which we’d been conducting for well over a decade. Bush led us to believe that the man who ordered the 9/11 attacks was small fry compared to Saddam “LURK, NUUUUUKES!” Hussein.

    The irony there? Hussein had long ago disposed of his WMDs, out of fear of retaliation, and also to try and keep good favor with the U.N./U.S.– we’ve been all over the country, and one of our own F.B.I. agents who managed to become a favorite to Hussein even got the words right from his mouth.

    The problem with being the world police is that it’s impossible. If you’re going to fight “evil” or terrorism, why not start with the biggest offenders? We sure gave blowjays to North Korea, and we’re constantly hugging Russia, despite how horribly corrupt Vladimir Putin is. The Philippines is constantly getting saddled with corrupt presidents, Colombia’s ran by drug lords, a solid chunk of Africa is FUBAR’d, China has violations all over like whoa, and Turkmenistan needs help in making sure that its Turkmenbashi-beaten hell doesn’t lead to another leader with the same egotistical insanity as Turkmenbashi/Saparumat Niyazov himself.

    Comment by Dio Brando — February 5, 2008 @ 1:58 pm | Reply

  11. I blame Al Gore.

    Remind me, who did actually set up the orders for that quagmire? I´d remember Gore doing it, you know.

    Comment by PG — February 5, 2008 @ 2:41 pm | Reply

  12. Who cares? WWII ended over 60 years ago. We won.

    We’re in a different war now that is a catastrophic failure.

    The tradeoff in Iraq is exchanging one dictatatorship for 3 dictatorships. Dumbasses. Oh yeah, the guy who attacked America named Bin Laden is still alive nd well in Pakistan.

    Failure is as failure does.

    Comment by BJ Hellboy Buttmuncher — February 5, 2008 @ 3:28 pm | Reply

  13. PG “I blame Al Gore.

    Remind me, who did actually set up the orders for that quagmire? I´d remember Gore doing it, you know.”

    Let us be fair here; Nancy Pelosi and Ted Kennedy had a lot to do with this too.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — February 5, 2008 @ 3:37 pm | Reply

  14. Let us be fair here; Nancy Pelosi and Ted Kennedy had a lot to do with this too.

    Yeah, lets be fair. Whose got the authority and responsibility for the troops at war again? That one rests firmly in the White House. Period.

    Comment by PG — February 5, 2008 @ 4:15 pm | Reply

  15. “Let us be fair here; Nancy Pelosi and Ted Kennedy had a lot to do with this too.”

    Two senators =/= President. Especially when the latter can organize troops without the former.

    Comment by Dio Brando — February 5, 2008 @ 5:05 pm | Reply

  16. Equating a rearguard military action of self sacrifice in defense of one’s homeland on one’s enemy’s military assets when that enemy is both militarily and economically superior, with an aggressive terrorist attack on the civilians of a nation that is not in open military conflict with the country of origin of the terrorists, is daft. Read some of the Kamikaze pilots’ writings. Maybe you’d then realise that to put them on a par with some of the current batch of terrorists is insulting

    @ Dio Brando February 5, 2008 @ 1:15 am, Arn February 5, 2008 @ 6:56 am, indyandy February 5, 2008 @ 9:11 am, PG February 5, 2008 @ 1:33 pm: What they said. Treat a lot of that as something else new to learn about and you’ll maybe get somewhere

    Oh, and probably more importantly, on the ‘try to refute the substance of my argument, picky-san’ bit, please remember that somebody famous said something like ‘But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you’. I’d be more impressed with your ‘tough love’ stuff if I thought you actually had the faintest inkling of what that phrase meant and your argument showed any sign of its being an integral part of your thesis. Demonstrate that first. You’re not even close.

    And in case you get any notions of my having some ‘liberal pinko’ bias or whatever, I’ve been to Hiroshima, I’ve stood where the bomb went off, I’ve seen the grave of tens of thousands, the records of those who died, listened to the appalling memories of those who survived and I still think what Truman, Stimson, Groves, etc decided, and what Tibbets and Sweeney and their crews did, was the right thing in their time.

    @ Diablo ‘Just a little not of interest, the Kamakazi pilots were the inspiration for the cruise missile’.

    Might want to think a little of the German’s V1 (which was both ground and air launched) and, inter alia, their Henschel HS 293 as the cruise’s more likely progenitors? The V1 was similar in style to, but predated, the ‘Oka’ or ‘Bakka’. Admittedly the V1 was unguided while the ‘Oka’/’Bakka’ was (man) guided. The Germans did have a trial of a manned V1 but this was not used in an operational capacity. The Hs 293 was a radio guided glide bomb. Combine their two weapons and you get somewhere nearer to a cruise missile, particularly these are not just airborne drops but also capable of ground and marine deployment, whereas the Japanese thingie was airborne only

    Comment by Ho Hum — February 5, 2008 @ 8:52 pm | Reply

  17. The German V2 rocket program, and basically all rocket designs of the time, focused on crude radio guidance systems. Rockets were basically thought of for long range big targets like cities. The Kamikazi attacks basically created a mind set of using highly accurate targeting system to hit small targets, like a ship or a single building.

    Comment by Diablo — February 5, 2008 @ 9:31 pm | Reply

  18. Diablo — February 5, 2008 @ 9:31 pm

    Yes, but the V2 was a ballistic weapon, like Minuteman, Polaris and trident. The V1, like the Cruise, wasn’t, so the V1 is the better parallel to Cruise and more akin as a technical progenitor. Agree on the pinpointing specific targets issue.

    Comment by Ho Hum — February 5, 2008 @ 9:54 pm | Reply

  19. Diablo, I see, has covered pretty much all of the valid points. So, I will leave the Libtards with some Conservative advice:

    How to get Peace
    How to stop pansies
    Got Ammo?
    Dear Eurocommies
    Why didn’t we do this to Japan faster?
    Why don’t we do it to Iran?
    Your precious Freud hates you!
    Broad Minded?
    The better Roosevelt

    Eat it, Leftists. We’re the cool kids, not the nerds. We sitteth on the RIGHT hand of God the Father Almighty, from whence we shall come to JUDGE the quick and the dead (foreigners).

    Comment by bobcorker — February 6, 2008 @ 12:13 am | Reply

  20. So are all Christfreaks racist? Or just everyone on this excuse for a blog?

    Comment by ian — February 6, 2008 @ 12:42 am | Reply

  21. “We’re the cool kids, not the nerds.”

    Evidently, you only hung out with the pasty, partially retarded kids. The lone Jesus “devout” I knew in school got locked out of his hotel room on a school trip, and nearly wet himself crying.

    Yeah, that’s what you get for trying to read all of Genesis to a bunch of tired classmates, followed by an hour-long speech on why we were doomed to eternal damnation.

    So Corksucker, how ’bout them blacks?

    Comment by Dio Brando — February 6, 2008 @ 2:05 am | Reply

  22. Since when does selling merchandise prove ANYTHING?

    Comment by Elephant Bones — February 6, 2008 @ 2:30 am | Reply

  23. @corker:

    How good peace through superior firepower worked we have seen in `Nam and are seeing in Iraq.

    The “Eurocommies” ones are simply the same old clichés that have been used about a trillion times too often to be any fun.
    (Especially as they´re for most of the part complete and utter bs. And I mean the ones denominating France. Can´t blame them for having someone even nastier as a neighbour.)

    And the rest…. I´ve seen funnier ones. Lots of ém.

    Eat it, Leftists. We’re the cool kids, not the nerds. We sitteth on the RIGHT hand of God the Father Almighty, from whence we shall come to JUDGE the quick and the dead (foreigners).

    Yadda, yadda…dream on about your big daddy god. If that´s all you can look up too, I pity you.

    Comment by PG — February 6, 2008 @ 6:55 am | Reply

  24. “Eat it, Leftists. We’re the cool kids, not the nerds. We sitteth on the RIGHT hand of God the Father Almighty, from whence we shall come to JUDGE the quick and the dead (foreigners).”

    The quick and the dead? Yeah, Sharon Stone was hot in that wasn’t she?

    We shall come to JUDGE,,,, So it’s no longer God’s job to judge, but yours. Yeah, right.

    Comment by Arn — February 6, 2008 @ 7:02 am | Reply

  25. Eat it, Leftists. We’re the cool kids, not the nerds. We sitteth on the RIGHT hand of God the Father Almighty, from whence we shall come to JUDGE the quick and the dead (foreigners).

    So you admit that you are a kid,
    kids should not play with guns.

    Comment by y7699 — February 6, 2008 @ 7:15 am | Reply

  26. “Judge not, lest ye be judged.” –Jesus Christ

    Imperial Japanese soldiers, from the first samurai to the kamikaze fighters of WWII, believed that to surrender was the greatest form of dishonor, and that even death would be preferable to the shame of bowing before an enemy. That is why a losing samurai would commit seppuku (ritual suicide), and that is why the kamikaze would assure the destruction of the enemy even at the cost of their own lives.

    This idea of loving one’s country to the point of death is not limited to the Far East. An old Roman poet (the name eludes me at the moment, but I think it was Cicero) said “Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori” (Translation: It is desirable and fitting to die for one’s country.) Patrick Henry, one of the great orators of the American Revolution, is famous for saying “As for me, give me liberty, or give me death!” The Apostles all died the horrible deaths of martyrs for refusing to renounce their Faith.

    I pity the thousands in the Middle East who have been taught that self-sacrifice in service of a false idealogy, and taking thousands of innocent civilians with you, is a hero’s death rather than an act of terrorism. There, but for the grace of God, go we.

    Comment by L — February 6, 2008 @ 11:25 am | Reply

  27. L´s right. This kind of attitude exists in any culture I can think off. And, as long as it´s in your, you´d actually would see it as a virtue.

    Klein unser Häuflein,
    wild unser Blut.
    Wir fürchten den Feind nicht und auch nicht den Tod.
    Wir wissen nur eines, wenn Deutschland in Not,
    zu kämpfen, zu siegen,
    zu sterben den Tod.
    An die Gewehre, an die Gewehre!
    Kamerad, da gibt es kein zurück!
    Am Himmel stehen dunkle Wolken.
    Komm mit, zage nicht, komm mit.

    Fallschirmjäger-Lied, 3rd Verse

    If anyone fancies, he can translate at will.

    Comment by PG — February 6, 2008 @ 1:55 pm | Reply

  28. “So you admit that you are a kid, kids should not play with guns.”

    It’s slang, dumbass. Also, we know you are Moxom.

    “There, but for the grace of God, go we.”

    That’s why we only want to kill their leaders, and then give the citizens of Islam nations a chance to convert to Christianity (up to 1 year).

    Comment by bobcorker — February 6, 2008 @ 7:19 pm | Reply

  29. I don’t think every culture necessarily sees it as a virtue.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dulce_Et_Decorum_Est#The_Poem

    Wilfred Owen, 1917

    It does say a great deal though for the character of those who subsequently fought and died in WW2, so relatively soon after the end of the Great War, insofar as many then fought as much for principle as for merely country

    Comment by Ho Hum — February 6, 2008 @ 7:21 pm | Reply

  30. Ho Hum, that’s WWI it was written about. It’s a beautiful poem, but is unfortuantely applied to the wrong places by Leftists many, many times.

    Comment by bobcorker — February 6, 2008 @ 7:25 pm | Reply

  31. Ho Hum, that’s WWI it was written about. It’s a beautiful poem, but is unfortuantely applied to the wrong places by Leftists many, many times.

    He said “subsequently”, genius.

    That’s why we only want to kill their leaders, and then give the citizens of Islam nations a chance to convert to Christianity (up to 1 year).

    And then what? Mass genocide? Even excluding the genocide, do you REALLY think Jesus/God would want followers who only follow in name only? In other words, would they want you. =P

    Comment by Dio Brando — February 6, 2008 @ 8:39 pm | Reply

  32. “That’s why we only want to kill their leaders, and then give the citizens of Islam nations a chance to convert to Christianity (up to 1 year)”

    There are times when I feel that border controls would be a good thing if they merely stop people like you getting out

    Comment by Ho Hum — February 7, 2008 @ 8:57 am | Reply

  33. “There are times when I feel that border controls would be a good thing if they merely stop people like you getting out”
    If they want to leave this country and never come back, I’ll gladly buy them a plane ticket.

    Comment by Elephant Bones — February 7, 2008 @ 2:20 pm | Reply

  34. Elephant Bones — February 7, 2008 @ 2:20 pm ‘If they want to leave this country and never come back, I’ll gladly buy them a plane ticket.’

    Well, make sure they are sent West rather than East, please. We don’t want them here.

    Comment by Ho Hum — February 7, 2008 @ 4:26 pm | Reply

  35. If they want to leave this country and never come back, I’ll gladly buy them a plane ticket.

    What makes you believe that any other country would actually let them in? It´s not like you could simply bring over toxic waste to another country and dump it there just like that, either.

    Comment by PG — February 7, 2008 @ 4:38 pm | Reply

  36. “That’s why we only want to kill their leaders, and then give the citizens of Islam nations a chance to convert to Christianity (up to 1 year).”

    Comment by bobcorker — February 6, 2008 @ 7:19 pm

    I’m sure Jesus really appreciates you using his the lords name in vane by endorsing murder. Living up to your name KKKorKKKer as usual.

    Comment by spacebrother — February 7, 2008 @ 4:48 pm | Reply

  37. PG — February 7, 2008 @ 4:38 pm It´s not like you could simply bring over toxic waste to another country and dump it there just like that, either.

    It’s getting a bit OT, but I think we have some trouble in this regard with some of your old naval boats…LOL

    Comment by Ho Hum — February 7, 2008 @ 6:48 pm | Reply

  38. HOLY HIROSHIMA! I had no idea that there were actually people in the US that were beyond the age iof fourteen and had not heard of kamikaze. My goodness, has the American public school system failed us so?

    Comment by Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu — March 3, 2008 @ 11:51 pm | Reply

  39. Welcome to some of the dumber-than-average states, ah-yup.

    Comment by Dio Brando — March 4, 2008 @ 12:30 am | Reply

  40. Claiming that suicide bombers of any sort are ‘crazy, stupid, or ignorant’ demonstrates ignorance on the part of whoever is making the claim. People who kill themselves in this fashion arent crazy, but desperate. They fight for something they truly believe in, whether it be defending their country or fighting injustice. It is especially ignorant to mention that [bullpoo] with the virgins in heaven and that being the reason that people kill themselves– it’s hardly true and was all hyped up after only being mentioned like once. And after all, isnt self-sacrafice something that the American culture prases too? Look at the end of independence day, when the good guy kills himself at the end by crashing his jet into the enemy mothership. What about the monk during the vietnam war who set himself on fire to protest? What about Martin Luther, who risked death hundreds of years ago by protesting against the catholic church? Were they all ignorant? Just because you can’t comprehend why someone would sacrafice his/her life for a cause doesnt mean you have to think that they are crazy.

    [Ed Note: FYI, Independence Day was a movie. And a lame one at that.]

    Comment by hjghc — April 3, 2008 @ 11:46 pm | Reply

  41. Whoa, Ed Note has some taste? Because I thought I was the only person who recognized how [poopie] the film Independence Day was from the moment it started.

    [Ed Note: Now you know.]

    Comment by Dio Brando — April 4, 2008 @ 1:37 am | Reply

  42. Ed just totally ignored everything else the guy said, what does that tell you?

    Comment by Elephant Bones — April 4, 2008 @ 8:11 am | Reply

  43. I agree with your statement about how dropping the bomb saved many lives but when you say that “you” cherish life unlike the “savages”, it seems as if your saying that we Japanese don’t care about our lives. That is false because its because we care about life that we are risking it to protect what we believed in. Isn’t that what America did too? When America declared independence from England, many patriots risked and many lost their life for what they believed in. So what if we have different ways to fight for what we believe in. Aren’t we doing the same thing?

    Oh and if we really were savages then we would of targeted you major civilian cities and not your military base. Also don’t forget that there was some “savages” that saved your soldiers during the war. I know that America did the same thing.

    Comment by SHUNsama — April 16, 2008 @ 3:44 am | Reply

  44. Don’t waste your time, Shunsama, these dipwads have their minds closed.

    Comment by Elephant Bones — April 16, 2008 @ 8:43 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: