Blogs 4 Brownback

August 11, 2007

Turmoil in the Toybox, Part III

Turmoil in the ToyboxI have to write this one quickly, because Jack’s up and he wants to write something too. On pages 62-63, the book excerpts a true paean to American eloquence:

If you have been listening to this commentary over the last five years, then you know that I have touched on almost every subject imaginable that is of interest to those of us who are conservatives. You may say, there’s nothing new he could talk about. There isn’t an outrage I haven’t heard. Well listen to this and see if this doesn’t top the list.

The Los Angeles-based Alliance for Gay and Lesbian Artists in the Entertainment Industry has called on those who make the Saturday morning cartoons, which our children watch, to begin depicting homosexual couples in cartoons.

According to a report in Electronic Media magazine, Charles Uszler, a spokesman for the Alliance, says he is not calling for homosexuals to be in the forefront of the cartoons, nor is he calling for discussions of sexuality. He thinks, though, that children need to know that same-sex couples exist and can live together in a domestic environment.

With the homosexuals already represented on television, certainly a lot more than, say, Christians and Jews, the battle for gay legitimacy now may be extending to our childen via the Saturday morning cartoons.

If I did not need a television set for the news and public affairs I must watch as a journalist, I would seriously consider getting rid of the box altogether. I already control my children’s access to it and want to know the content of a show before they watch it.

I take the trash out twice a week to be collected by the garbage man. But with television, it is increasingly a case of bringing the trash into the house seven days and nights a week. It has so much garbage on it that it might violate clean air standards of the Environmental Protection Agency.

There have been numerous stories of families who have tried doing without television for varying periods of time. I have never read a report that shows they regretted their decision. After an initial withdrawal period, most of them report improved communication, improved grades and improved reading skills.

It won’t be much longer, given the current trend, when television is as constantly ditry as a sewer or septic tank. You wouldn’t want you children playing in those places either, would you?

I’m Cal Thomas.

Anything I could add would only be redundant. That’s one of the most beautiful things I’ve read outside of Scripture. It holds as true today as it did in 1986. It’s wondreful.

See also: Turmoil in the Toybox, Part I and Part II.

4 Comments »

  1. Cal Thomas is a brilliant and eloquent Christian American!

    Comment by Helen Bock — August 11, 2007 @ 6:05 pm | Reply

  2. Cal Thomas is a paranoid sissy! Don’t let TV raise your children, raise them yourself.

    Comment by Brandon Explosion — August 13, 2007 @ 8:10 am | Reply

  3. The family who uses TV as a babysitter is a poor family indeed.

    Here’s a tip: turn off the TV, cancel your cable subscription, and actually spend time with your children.

    Comment by Adam Nelson — August 13, 2007 @ 7:17 pm | Reply

  4. […] Toy Box! Filed under: Family, Faith, Religion — Psycheout @ 8:46 pm A solution for the Turmoil in the Toybox can be found at the online store run by Focus on the Family friends one2believe.  At last there […]

    Pingback by The Battle for the Toy Box! « Blogs 4 Brownback — August 17, 2007 @ 8:47 pm | Reply


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