Blogs 4 Brownback

August 7, 2007

Turmoil in the Toybox, Part I

Turmoil in the ToyboxSo far, this book has been more than worth its price. There are a few quotations in particular that I would like to share with my Christian brothers and sisters, and with any idiot moonbat sinners in dire need of redemption. On pages 22-23, the book states,

Children spend most of their play time in the world of “let’s pretend.” In his imaginative play, a child can think himself into situations, work out reactions and generally come to terms, his own terms, with people and events. In his imagination, games and play materials are actually miniature replicas of the adult world… However, when children consistently pretend to be mystical characters, they are not recreating a real world. Often, when a person fantasizes too much on one thing, especially on something filled with the occult, that fantasy runs the risk of becoming a reality. Herein lies the problem.

Some “experts” believe fantasy is good. In fact, many psychologists encourage patients to use fantasy and illusions to deal with personal tragedies or physical or emotional setbacks. Others say to fantasize is wrong. Most psychologists agree that after personal tragedy, illusions and fantasies are crucial to psychological adjustment; however, the patient must have a firm understanding of reality…

Toys allow children to let their imagination run free, unrestricted from pre-set ideas. Nevertheless, these good influences also can be extremely harmful if occult symbols and violence are used. Occult symbols and violence guide a child’s imagination into the world of Satan…

To discipline the imagination, it is wise to avoid television, books and toys which present occult, violent or sexual images. Through these, Satan stimulates one’s mind to focus on vain and carnal fantasies. Imaginative play that is not focused on exploring the real world, but on the mystical world, is called “vain imagination.” When involved in “vain imaginative play,” children often exalt themselves above God, by pretending to be characters which they believe to be more powerful than Jesus.

(emphasis in original) Heady stuff, that. We can see that the roots of American atheism lie in the toy industry. Then, on pages 36-37, he provides concrete anecdotal examples of these same tendencies in American children:

A mother and her young son riding in the car were listening to a sermon on the radio. The minister started to pray: “Our Lord God, the master of the universe…” The little boy jumped up from the back seat of the car and said, “Mommy, God isn’t the master of the universe, He-Man is.”

There was one little girl who ran around the house doing everything by the power of Grayskull. Grayskull is a demon-possessed castle in the He-Man series. But, after hearing me speak at church, she started running around the house doing everything by the power of Jesus.

There is another case where a mother and her young son were in the car and they just had a near collision. Understandably, the mother was upset. So, the little boy put his hand on his mother’s lap and said, “Don’t worry, Mommy, He-Man would have saved us.”

Once my father was ministering at a church and he mentioned my ministry. Briefly he also mentioned He-Man. After the service, a little boy was seen in the parking lot running in circles while holding his He-Man figure in his hand. He kept repeating, “He-Man has more power than Jesus. He-Man has more power than Jesus.”

Chilling tales that should shake you to your core. Clearly, these toys allow demons to enter childrens’ minds.

As I keep reading the book, I’ll keep posting material that seems especially interesting and relevant. My hope is that the Brownback Administration takes concrete steps to ban the sale of toys containing occult influences. If a few toymakers go to jail for life or find themselves on death row, I wouldn’t see a problem with that. Better they die soon, with a chance to repent, than die later, in the full gluttony of sin and damnation, having drawn thousands more children down into Hell alongside them.

That’s the way I feel about it, anyway. You, of course, may draw your own conclusions. Just pray that they’re the right ones.

53 Comments »

  1. I wish the authors could do an update to the book for today’s world. I see so many children running around pretending to be Harry Potter that it breaks my heart. What in the world is wrong with their parents?? Anyone who buys their child a Harry Potter book or toy or movie should be charged with child abuse, in my opinion. Yes, liberals, that’s what it is. Allowing or actively encouraging a child to condemn their soul to eternal damnation is child abuse, plain and simple.

    Comment by Promisekeeper — August 7, 2007 @ 9:57 am | Reply

  2. “Anyone who buys their child a Harry Potter book or toy or movie should be charged with child abuse, in my opinion. Yes, liberals, that’s what it is. Allowing or actively encouraging a child to condemn their soul to eternal damnation is child abuse, plain and simple.”

    Amen!

    Comment by Sisyphus — August 7, 2007 @ 10:14 am | Reply

  3. Psst! Conservatives buy Harry Potter for their kids as well!

    Comment by La Mona — August 7, 2007 @ 10:29 am | Reply

  4. I think you bring up an excellent point Sisyphus; today’s Harry Potter fan will be tomorrow’s’ atheist. When people start believing that they, not God, can do magic then they stop believing in God. Just look at England, it is just filled with pagan-atheists and that is were stuff like Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings comes from.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — August 7, 2007 @ 10:39 am | Reply

  5. I had a Barbie doll as a child. When my daghter was born I burned it lest it corrupt her with the lust for “glamor” and fancy clothes as it did me when I was an unsaved child.

    Comment by Ann O'Maly — August 7, 2007 @ 10:50 am | Reply

  6. When will some toymaker come out with Christian dolls to edify children?

    Comment by Maura Ghee — August 7, 2007 @ 10:52 am | Reply

  7. When my children were wee I got them Christian blocks to play with. I forget the manufacturer”s name.

    Comment by dadaclu — August 7, 2007 @ 10:54 am | Reply

  8. “Psst! Conservatives buy Harry Potter for their kids as well!”

    Yes, sadly, Harry Potter is a bipartisan blight. Please don’t get me started on so-called “Christians” who allow their children to consume such trash.

    Comment by Promisekeeper — August 7, 2007 @ 11:10 am | Reply

  9. I think you’re all right about Harry Potter.

    In fact, keeping with the Blogs4brownback tradition, I recommend sending J.K. Rowling to Guantanamo immediately.

    Comment by Fascinated and Confused — August 7, 2007 @ 11:25 am | Reply

  10. Extremists are the problem. Taking something too far is the real issue. But anywho, if you’re against Harry Potter are you also against Lord of the Rings and Narnia? (both written by Christian authors)

    Comment by La Mona — August 7, 2007 @ 11:26 am | Reply

  11. Thank you very, very much for introducing this book to me. I am so impressed that I have already ordered mine from one the Godless retailers on the web that offer it.

    Here’s the sad part: People seem to think the book is funny. That’s how far our society has fallen, that someone can take an honest effort like this and make fun of it. That makes me so sad. I pray for these… Infidels. Is Infidels too strong a term? I think not.

    There is an update on the book, but I think even the update may need updating by now. I recognized He-Man as being gay a very long time ago, but when was He-Man last on the shelves?

    Comment by MikeM — August 7, 2007 @ 11:40 am | Reply

  12. “Chilling tales that should shake you to your core. Clearly, these toys allow demons to enter childrens’ minds.”

    Hahaha what a stupid post. It’s all about how evil He-Man is (not even a popular franchise). This book sounds hilarious.

    Comment by Brandon Explosion — August 7, 2007 @ 11:45 am | Reply

  13. By the way, Walmart is doing its part to bring kids back to Christ.

    Another example of why “Turmoil” needs updating: Spongebob Squarepants.

    Need I say more?

    Comment by MikeM — August 7, 2007 @ 11:46 am | Reply

  14. “When people start believing that they, not God, can do magic then they stop believing in God.”

    I’ve never met a Harry Potter fan (of any age) who actually believes they can do magic, or takes any of the book literally. And guess what? Neither have you BJ. The whole point of this is imagination. As long as they don’t treat it as reality, what’s the deal?

    Comment by Brandon Explosion — August 7, 2007 @ 11:47 am | Reply

  15. I’ve never met a Harry Potter fan (of any age) who actually believes they can do magic,

    That’s why they stop believing in God. Rowlings lies to to them, telling them they can do magic. When they find out they can’t they stop believing in any magic, including God’s. That’s why children’s fantasies put them on a greased pole to hell.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — August 7, 2007 @ 11:55 am | Reply

  16. TV is definately the biggest problem. All those vile ideas get into people’s heads.

    but there are worse violent sadistic events

    http://www.benjaminchristie.com/article/226/clam-chowder-in-rhode-island-australian-style

    These children should be put to work cleaning up sewage treatment plants so that we have better water quality! That will keep them AND their imginary friends busy.

    Comment by Happy Clam — August 7, 2007 @ 12:04 pm | Reply

  17. @Sisyphus: How old were the kids described in the entry? Because if they were young, then they’d likely outgrow their silly fantasies as they age.

    @BJ Tabor: You misunderstood what Brandon said. No Harry Potter fans actually believe they can do magic. The Harry Potter books are what we call fiction.

    Comment by AutoFire — August 7, 2007 @ 12:22 pm | Reply

  18. I finished Hallows the Tuesday after it came out. I loved it. It’s all fiction, though, just like LOTR.

    Given that I finished with probably the top 2% of the book’s readers, I cannot spoil it for others. But I will say to people that, if you haven’t read it and still try to interpret it, chances are quite high you’ll get it all wrong.

    I predict that in 19 years (I cannot disclose why I choose the number 19), Christians will view this book in a very different light than they do now. I may not even be alive to see that prediction come true, but I view this eventuality as a certainty.

    I say this while noting that Spongebob is clearly not normal.

    Would Republicans rather be like Albus Dumbledore and Harry Potter, or more like He Who Must Not Be Named?

    Landover claims there is a scene in HP7 that simply does not exist.

    Comment by MikeM — August 7, 2007 @ 12:35 pm | Reply

  19. “Psst! Conservatives buy Harry Potter for their kids as well!”

    Those are RINOs.

    In fact, keeping with the Blogs4brownback tradition, I recommend sending J.K. Rowling to Guantanamo immediately.”

    Unfortunately she’s British, and unlikely to travel to a war zone where we could get our hands on her. The British should do the right thing, though, and deport her to Scotland. Then they should bury her up to her waist in a mudhole, chain her arms and let the raccoons and squirrels work her over for a while. (I know Scotland has no raccoons indigenously. But hopefully, they’ve imported them by now, to give the Islamists and J.K. Rowlings something to worry about.)

    The Lord moves in mysterious ways.

    Comment by Sisyphus — August 7, 2007 @ 12:41 pm | Reply

  20. Luckily, they aren’t your ways….

    Comment by La Mona — August 7, 2007 @ 12:53 pm | Reply

  21. Sis@20:

    With all the Islamofacists taking over Merry Ol’ England, it won’t be long before that country actually is a war zone. As I always say, why bother waiting; bomb ’em now and save us the trouble later.

    Comment by Fascinated and Confused — August 7, 2007 @ 12:55 pm | Reply

  22. “As I always say, why bother waiting; bomb ‘em now and save us the trouble later.”

    There is still hope. Albion may not yet turn out to be perfidious.

    Comment by Sisyphus — August 7, 2007 @ 1:04 pm | Reply

  23. @Autofire Teaching children magic is fiction is the problem with the Harry Potter books. If you don’t believe in magic you don’t believe in God. The Harry Potter books portray magic workers as deluded children in a make believe world who hold the rest of the humanity in contempt for not sharing in their collective hallucination. Clearly this is outright attack on Christianity.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — August 7, 2007 @ 1:37 pm | Reply

  24. BJ makes no sense.

    By the power of Grayskull, please stop this dumb topic!!!

    Comment by Brandon Explosion — August 7, 2007 @ 1:49 pm | Reply

  25. BJ makes no sense.

    Do I have to spell it out for you Brandon?

    Hogworts = Church

    Wizard = Pastor

    Magic = Christianity

    Muggels = sinner

    The list just goes on. Rowlings thought she could be sly by creating this collection of smug, obnoxious and elitist characters as a parody of Christians but Jesus sees threw her little plan.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — August 7, 2007 @ 2:34 pm | Reply

  26. A committee of good Christian pastors should be appointed by President Brownback to review these toys before they are introduced to children.

    Comment by Enola Tibbets — August 7, 2007 @ 3:05 pm | Reply

  27. You cannot be serious, Tabor.

    Comment by Linus — August 7, 2007 @ 6:12 pm | Reply

  28. Sis- Rowling already lives in Scotland, and couldn’t be deported there if she didn’t, as it’s the same country as England.

    Comment by Salmo — August 7, 2007 @ 7:05 pm | Reply

  29. Haha, how predictable, a Christian scared of literature and ideas not their own. What’s next a crusade; perhaps a book burning? Good thing that with political views like this Brownback will never fucking achieve the presidency, the world has hopefully had it’s fill of fascist rhetoric.

    Comment by Gavin — August 7, 2007 @ 7:17 pm | Reply

  30. You cannot be serious, Tabor.

    I am as serious as the Fires of Hell Linus. What other organized group is there in our society that rejects rationalism and believes they are granted power and gifts by simply wishing? The Harry Potter books are a clear allegory /parody of Christianity.

    Comment by BJ Tabor — August 7, 2007 @ 9:55 pm | Reply

  31. “A committee of good Christian pastors should be appointed by President Brownback to review these toys before they are introduced to children.”

    These toys were released to children in 1986, the same time as this book was released to wide derision.

    Comment by Salmo — August 7, 2007 @ 10:52 pm | Reply

  32. “Sis- Rowling already lives in Scotland, and couldn’t be deported there if she didn’t, as it’s the same country as England.”

    That should make it even easier, then. They just need to surround her house and let the squirrels in. She won’t last six hours before she cracks.

    Comment by Sisyphus — August 8, 2007 @ 5:48 am | Reply

  33. “The Harry Potter books are a clear allegory /parody of Christianity.”

    Well, that’s certainly a unique oppinion. I think they just might be, uh, children’s fantasy books. If Christianity was half as popular as Harry Potter among kids….hehehe.

    “That should make it even easier, then. They just need to surround her house and let the squirrels in. She won’t last six hours before she cracks.”

    What point are you trying to make again?

    Comment by Brandon Explosion — August 8, 2007 @ 8:20 am | Reply

  34. What point are you trying to make again?”

    Torture the Satanists. Torture the Islamists. Do it for America.

    Comment by Sisyphus — August 8, 2007 @ 12:07 pm | Reply

  35. What does the torture of others do for America? I would be greatly amused if you were able to prove something…though, I am not sure you can condone torture rationally. Good luck though.

    Comment by La Mona — August 8, 2007 @ 3:32 pm | Reply

  36. Well, that’s certainly a unique oppinion. I think they just might be, uh, children’s fantasy books. If Christianity was half as popular as Harry Potter among kids….hehehe.

    Brandon,

    There is nothing funny about mocking Christianity. Do you think it is funny to mock people’s deeply held belief? Are you that cruel and callous?

    Comment by BJ Tabor — August 8, 2007 @ 3:50 pm | Reply

  37. No, you’re cruel and callous. You, who consistently pray for the death of all who disagree with you, Sisyphus, and TDGC.

    Comment by AutoFire — August 8, 2007 @ 3:53 pm | Reply

  38. BJ Tabor, you’re not in a very good position to be calling anybody cruel or callous.

    I guess we should also ban math, as it contains cruel atheistic ideas like pi equalling 3.141592654… and that 2 plus 2 equals 4, and NOT Jesus.

    Comment by Adam Nelson — August 8, 2007 @ 5:13 pm | Reply

  39. “I guess we should also ban math, as it contains cruel atheistic ideas like pi equalling 3.141592654… and that 2 plus 2 equals 4, and NOT Jesus.”

    True math holds that pi is 3. Pagan math will land you in Hellfire, Adam.

    Comment by Sisyphus — August 9, 2007 @ 8:50 am | Reply

  40. “True math holds that pi is 3. Pagan math will land you in Hellfire, Adam.”

    No. No it doesn’t. And no, no it won’t.

    I nominate that we call Sisyphus’s math ‘idiot math’ and regular math, just math.

    Comment by Brandon Explosion — August 9, 2007 @ 11:34 am | Reply

  41. Sisyphus, I don’t think you actually know what a Pagan is.

    I second the Sisyphus/Idiot Math nomination! Hey, maybe that’s why American cars suck so much! Because they use idiot math! “D’uh, pi equals 3 for da cylinders, chief!”

    Comment by Adam Nelson — August 10, 2007 @ 9:03 am | Reply

  42. This sounds like a wonderful book. Thank you for telling us about it, Sisyphus!

    Comment by Marcia P. — August 10, 2007 @ 9:09 am | Reply

  43. […] See also: Turmoil in the Toybox, Part I. […]

    Pingback by Turmoil in the Toybox, Part II « Blogs 4 Brownback — August 12, 2007 @ 4:52 pm | Reply

  44. […] also: Turmoil in the Toybox, Part I and Part […]

    Pingback by Turmoil in the Toybox, Part III « Blogs 4 Brownback — August 12, 2007 @ 4:53 pm | Reply

  45. […] a blogger who claims to have actually read Turmoil in the Toybox, and quotes this sobering passage from the […]

    Pingback by Turmoil in the toybox! | Think Christian — September 11, 2008 @ 8:42 pm | Reply

  46. Okay, I was reading the article, and as funny as I though it may be, the comments were the best part. Can’t you see that you guys are extremist. I, personally, am a Christian. Not one who just says it and does whatever, but really live my life as one. Now, I can see where you guys are having issues but really. He-man, Care bears, and all that other stuff. It’s normal childhood cartoons. It’s not that bad. Please just see you are taking things a bit too far.

    Comment by Underoath :D — September 12, 2008 @ 1:35 pm | Reply

  47. […] The Devil’s Toybox? Blogs 4 Brownback is a pathetic receptacle of ignorance where fundamentalist christians can rewrite the ten […]

    Pingback by Imagination: The Devil’s Toybox? « THE SKEPTIC DAD — September 17, 2008 @ 1:13 pm | Reply

  48. hemanhasmorepowerthanjesushemanhasmorepowerthanjesushemanhasmorepowerthanjesushemanhasmorepowerthanjesus

    Yeah right.

    Comment by talfonso — April 4, 2009 @ 11:19 am | Reply

  49. Hey, does this guy have a modern blog for today’s toys. This is all very interesting, but 25 years out of date.

    Comment by skot — August 11, 2009 @ 5:22 am | Reply

  50. I grew up in a Christian home playing with He-Man figures. Quite honestly, I think you’re giving children a little too much credit. I don’t even remember the magic side to it, and I didn’t really get the story anyway or start taking up black magic. I saw a man with muscles and thought it was cool. It was really that simple.

    I’d worry more about things we get into as s, being one them. It warps the mind of what uality was meant to be and what God intended it to be.

    Comment by Jesse — August 20, 2009 @ 6:56 am | Reply

  51. Oh, man! He-Man has blasphemous materials and must be burned at the stake for witchcraft! He is the wolf in sheep’s clothing!

    Comment by V.E.G. — October 29, 2009 @ 4:47 pm | Reply

  52. The Care Bears are the wolves in sheep’s clothing.

    Comment by V.E.G. — October 29, 2009 @ 4:49 pm | Reply

  53. Oh. My. Fucking. Hell. You people make me sick and nauseous. Have any of you even read a page of Harry Potter? Did you ever watch a full episode of the Care Bears? They are BASIC and FUNDAMENTAL good vs. evil stories and nothing else. Please point me toward any source stating that a child read Potter in the late 90s and became a witch later on. There is no proof here, no intellect, and a focus on morality and works that overshadows the necessity of faith in Christ. You are draining your children’s awareness. You should all be ashamed of yourself. Thinking that these books condone magical exercise is just stupid.

    Comment by Shay — June 27, 2010 @ 3:23 am | Reply


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