Blogs 4 Brownback

July 4, 2007

Happy Birthday, America!

Filed under: Open Thread — Psycheout @ 3:18 am

The entire B4B Team wish you a safe and sane Independence Day.  This is the day to remember and observe all that makes America great — the greatest nation on the face of the earth since it’s creation by the one true G-d.

This is also a day to make America greater.  Do your part by contributing whatever you can to Sam Brownback today.

G-d bless America and let her freedom reign.

— Psycheout (on behalf of the entire B4B Team)

33 Comments »

  1. i know far greater nations. for example kasachstan, the greatest country in the world. *yak-sha-mash*

    Comment by bienmatou — July 4, 2007 @ 5:32 am | Reply

  2. Amen! I pray for everyone here to have a grand old time as you commemorate the birth of our wonderful Nation throughout the day. Depending on your means and traditions, you can enjoy hamburgers and Freedom fries in the back yard or Surf n’ Turf at the country club with American Pride, just remember to be safe about it. Thanks to Bill Clinton and the Liberal Elite, terrorists are hiding all over the United States of God waiting to kill you and take away your Freedom.

    God Bless Sam Brownback, Patriotic Americans and Christians!

    Comment by Mrs. T.D. Gaines-Crockett — July 4, 2007 @ 5:46 am | Reply

  3. I know far greater gods, too. This Yahweh fellow sounds like something of a ponce if you ask me. Cthulhu would make short work of him.

    Comment by Realist — July 4, 2007 @ 5:47 am | Reply

  4. I’ll take French fries, thanks.

    Comment by Linus — July 4, 2007 @ 6:15 am | Reply

  5. Of course you would, Linus. After your communist dinner where you will raise a toast to the Liberals and terrorists, I bet you will rush to the theater to be the first in line to see that smut flim, Sicko. Your hero, Michael Moore, knows that the Liberals will flock to see that trash on the very Birthday of our Nation. Shame on you and Michael Moore. I hope your popcorn is stale.

    Comment by Mrs. T.D. Gaines-Crockett — July 4, 2007 @ 6:34 am | Reply

  6. I actually don’t particularly like Michael Moore, and I hate terrorism. I’ll probably see Sicko, though, and I do support socialism, if only in principle. I don’t have time to see Sicko today, anyway.

    Comment by Linus — July 4, 2007 @ 6:45 am | Reply

  7. Perhaps there is a remote chance of hope for you yet, Linus.

    Comment by Mrs. T.D. Gaines-Crockett — July 4, 2007 @ 6:53 am | Reply

  8. Pity his poll numbers are down the toilet:

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/2008/president/us/republican_presidential_nomination-192.html

    06/26 – 06/27:
    Giuliani 29%
    Thompson 15%
    McCain 17%
    Romney 8%
    Gingrich 8%
    Brownback ??

    “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job!”

    Comment by Tyler Durden — July 4, 2007 @ 7:46 am | Reply

  9. Crockett, are we tossing blind accusations this early in the morning? Oh well. Happy 4th to the rest of ya. Here’s a game for ya….what’s one bit of American History that appeals/stands out to you? For those not in America, give something of your own (of America or your own country–doesn’t matter. It’s whatever floats your boat.)….I wanna see if this can be civil. Anyone care to help in my…shall we call it adventure? Maybe someone will learn something.

    Comment by La Mona — July 4, 2007 @ 7:50 am | Reply

  10. “My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you — ask what can you do for your country.”
    Inaugural Address by John F. Kennedy – January 20th 1961

    Comment by Tyler Durden — July 4, 2007 @ 8:04 am | Reply

  11. America-Hater Tyler Durden,

    Your Liberal faux-poll numbers mean nothing. What are you doing here anyway? Don’t you have an American flag to burn in protest of true Americans.

    Lamona,

    For the Love of God can’t you just be silent for one day resepct the Patriots of this site? Where are your parents, at some staged love-in for the spotted owl? And why are they supervising your internet access?

    Comment by Mrs. T.D. Gaines-Crockett — July 4, 2007 @ 8:05 am | Reply

  12. Try reading the article first Mrs. T, those “Liberal faux-poll numbers” were actually from Fox News.

    Comment by Tyler Durden — July 4, 2007 @ 8:09 am | Reply

  13. No I can’t be silent…not when you people are like this. Besides, I didn’t say anything that would be offensive…I pointed out how you are once again attcking blindly, but that doesn’t change with the day. My mom is at work and my dad is sitting about 10 feet away. I haven’t disresepected any “Patriot” here. Please, stop trying to duck the issue and play nice. I shouldn’t have to tell that to someone twice my age…..

    Comment by La Mona — July 4, 2007 @ 8:13 am | Reply

  14. Aide to Sam Brownback Reprimanded Over Anti-Mormon E-Mail
    Monday, June 18, 2007

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,284056,00.html?sPage=fnc.politics/youdecide2008

    WASHINGTON — An aide to GOP presidential candidate Sam Brownback has been reprimanded for sending e-mail to Iowa Republican leaders in an apparent attempt to draw unfavorable scrutiny to rival Mitt Romney’s Mormonism.

    Emma Nemecek, the southeastern Iowa field director for Brownback’s presidential campaign and a former state representative candidate, violated campaign policy when she forwarded the June 6 e-mail from an interest group raising the questions, the Brownback campaign said Sunday.

    The e-mail requested help in fact-checking a series of statements about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

    Among the statements: “Theologically, the only thing Christianity and the LDS church has in common is the name of Jesus Christ, and the LDS Jesus is not the same Jesus of the Christian faith” and “The LDS church has never been accepted by the Christian Council of Churches.”

    “Sen. Brownback completely disavows himself of this and any personal attacks on religion,” said Brian Hart, a spokesman for the Kansas senator. Hart said the campaign apologized to Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, once they learned of the e-mail.

    “It was not originated by Ms. Nemecek and the purpose was to fact-check. But it was in violation of campaign policy and it won’t happen again,” he said.

    The controversy comes as Brownback and Romney are scrambling to attract socially conservative voters in advance of Iowa’s Jan. 14, 2008, caucuses.

    Both candidates say they are ardently anti-abortion, although Brownback — a former Methodist who has become an evangelical Roman Catholic — has criticized Romney for supporting abortion rights as recently as two and a half years ago.

    A spokesman for Romney’s Iowa campaign, Tim Albrecht, said the campaign accepted Brownback’s apology but called the incident “unfortunate.”

    “It’s unfortunate that these attacks of religious bigotry were taking place,” Albrecht said. “Sen. Brownback has apologized and we are glad he has worked to minimize these repugnant attacks in his campaign. There is just no place for these types of attacks in America today.”

    Comment by Tyler Durden — July 4, 2007 @ 8:13 am | Reply

  15. Brownback Booed in Wisconsin After Football Remark
    Saturday, May 12, 2007
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,271861,00.html

    LAKE GENEVA, Wis. — Note to Sen. Sam Brownback: In Packerland, it’s not cool to diss Brett Favre. The GOP presidential hopeful drew boos and groans Friday at the Wisconsin Republican Party convention when he used a football analogy to talk about the need to focus on families.

    “This is fundamental blocking and tackling,” he said. “This is your line in football. If you don’t have a line, how many passes can Peyton Manning complete? Greatest quarterback, maybe, in NFL history.”

    Oops, wrong team to mention in Wisconsin, once described by Gov. Tommy Thompson as the place “where eagles soar, Harleys roar and Packers score.”

    Realizing what he had said, the Kansas Republican slumped at the podium and put his head in his hands.

    “That’s really bad,” he said. “That will go down in history. I apologize.”

    His apology brought a smattering of applause and laughter. He tried to recover, saying former Packer Bart Starr may be the greatest of all time, but the crowd was still restless.

    “Let’s take Favre then,” Brownback said. “The Packers are great. I’m sorry. How many passes does he complete without a line?”

    “All of them!” more than one person yelled from the back.

    “I’m not sure how I recover from this,” Brownback said. “My point is we’ve got to rebuild the family. I’ll get off this.”

    Comment by Tyler Durden — July 4, 2007 @ 8:18 am | Reply

  16. Tyler, don’t be mean. Let’s just have a lovely Independence Day. I know! Let’s celebrate by quoting some great speeches of the Founding Fathers of this Christian nation!

    **THOMAS JEFFERSON**

    “…an amendment [to the constitution] was proposed by inserting the words, ‘Jesus Christ…the holy author of our religion,’ which was rejected ‘By a great majority in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of its protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and the Mohammedan, the Hindoo and the Infidel of every denomination.'”

    “The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as his father, in the womb of a virgin, will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter.”

    “Reason and persuasion are the only practicable instruments.”

    “I have examined all the known superstitions of the world, and I do not find in our particular superstition of Christianity one redeeming feature. They are all alike founded on fables and mythology. Millions of innocent men, women and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined and imprisoned. What has been the effect of this coercion? To make one half of the world fools and the other half hypocrites; to support roguery and error all over the earth.”

    “Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.”

    **JOHN ADAMS**

    “Twenty times in the course of my late reading, have I been upon the point of breaking out, ‘this would be the best of all possible worlds, if there were no religion in it.'”

    “The government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion.”

    **JAMES MADISON**

    “Religion and government will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together.”

    **GEORGE WASHINGTON**

    “There is nothing which can better deserve our patronage than the promotion of science…”

    “I beg you be persuaded that no one would be more zealous than myself to establish effectual barriers against the horrors of spiritual tyranny, and every species of religious persecution.”

    **BENJAMIN FRANKLIN**

    “…Some books against Deism fell into my hands….It happened that they wrought an effect on me quite contrary to what was intended by them; for the arguments of the Deists, which were quote to be refuted, appeared to me much stronger than the refutations.”

    **THOMAS PAINE**

    “All natural institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian, or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit.”

    “The most detestable wickedness, the most horrid cruelties, and the greatest miseries that have afflicted the human race have had their origin in this thing called revelation, or revealed religion.”

    “What is it the Bible teaches us? — rapine, cruelty, and murder.”

    Comment by Salmo — July 4, 2007 @ 8:48 am | Reply

  17. Why thank you for that glorious tribute! I am always grateful to be able to celebrate the founding of our G-dly nation, founded after shooing those nettlesome feather-heads off our land and bringing in the Negros over for cheap labor.

    Some silly LIE-berals yak incessantly about the injustices, but verily, wouldn’t you prefer to serve tea and cocktails in a lovely Virginia manse than hunting crocodiles and elephants in some G-dforsaken forest somewhere?

    Praise!

    Comment by Sister Betty — July 4, 2007 @ 8:57 am | Reply

  18. America is a wonderfull country that knows how to protect its citizens:

    “Executive Order No. 9066 Authorizing the Secretary of War to Prescribe Military Areas

    Whereas the successful prosecution of the war requires every possible protection against espionage and against sabotage ….

    Now, therefore, …. I hereby authorize and direct …to prescribe military areas … from which any or all persons may be excluded, and with respect to which, the right of any person to enter, remain in, or leave shall be subject to whatever restrictions …may impose in his discretion.

    The designation of military areas in any region or locality shall supersede [any other authority]

    I hereby further authorize and direct … Commanders to take such other steps … to enforce compliance with the restrictions applicable … including the use of Federal troops.

    Franklin D Roosevelt (actually a traitor to his class and a communist but in this case he got it right.)

    Comment by Happy Clam — July 4, 2007 @ 10:46 am | Reply

  19. G-dash-D? G-dash-D?

    What century are you living in, Brownback blogger? If you’re sense of piety is so thin-skinned that you find it irreverent to write the name of a deity, how does using a “-” instead of an “o” get you off the hook? One symbol is as good as another, since both get the same word across to the reader.

    Jesus Christ! You hillbillies are so literal-minded and so literacy-bereft, it’s stupefying.

    Does Sam know about this? Has he approved this message?

    Comment by i_capricorn — July 4, 2007 @ 10:58 am | Reply

  20. Thank you Salmo for your July 4th history lesson.

    However, the founding fathers, children of the Enlightenment that they were, underestimated how important faith was to governance

    Not a founding father but certainly one their most influential contemporaries, Napoleon was not so exulted that he did not see the great value of religion. “Religion,” he observed,” is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich.”

    Comment by i_capricorn — July 4, 2007 @ 11:25 am | Reply

  21. Thank you for congratulating this godless-commie-treefrog-liberal with his 20th birthday! (God must have a great sense of humor.)

    Comment by Skeptic — July 4, 2007 @ 11:33 am | Reply

  22. Is this really your birthday, Skeptic? Happy Birthday, dear. Even heathens are entitled to one day of fun.

    Comment by Mrs. T.D. Gaines-Crockett — July 4, 2007 @ 11:36 am | Reply

  23. “If you’re sense of piety is so thin-skinned that you find it irreverent to write the name of a deity, how does using a “-” instead of an “o” get you off the hook?”

    It comes from a Jewish tradition that the name of God shouldn’t be written in full, lest you deface or erase it. Common Rabbinic custom says it only applies to the name written in Hebrew, but many orthodox Jews still do it. Some Jews consider it a mitzvah, most consider it a minhag, and plenty don’t do it at all.

    Comment by Salmo — July 4, 2007 @ 11:41 am | Reply

  24. By the way, ‘mitzvah’ means law, and ‘minhag’ means custom.

    Comment by Salmo — July 4, 2007 @ 11:42 am | Reply

  25. […] As out two friends for Brownback make no hesitation in telling us, today is July 4. So I would just like to remember with […]

    Pingback by July 4! « Blogs 4 Moonbats — July 4, 2007 @ 11:42 am | Reply

  26. “Is this really your birthday, Skeptic?”

    Yes, it really is.

    “Even heathens are entitled to one day of fun.”

    Thank you for your unparalleled kindness!

    Comment by Skeptic — July 4, 2007 @ 12:09 pm | Reply

  27. Salmo, the fact that Orthodox Jews substitute dashes for letters in the word Yahweh makes it no less moronic. Either you can write the name of the deity or you can’t. Dashes communicates the word as much as the missing vowels. According to the rules of mitzvah and minhag, then, the deity is better served by inaccuracy and euphemism, then by directness and truth. Doesn’t that give the whole scam away right there?

    Comment by i_capricorn — July 4, 2007 @ 2:55 pm | Reply

  28. “Dashes communicates the word as much as the missing vowels. ”

    Well, that’s the point. The name itself is considered holy. By writing G-d, you’re communicating the idea, while not writing the name itself. Writing is considered holy, don’t forget. Words put to paper are given life and form.

    But as I said, it’s merely a tradition. So don’t stress it.

    Comment by Salmo — July 4, 2007 @ 4:52 pm | Reply

  29. A belated happy birthday, Skeptic.

    Salmo, Thomas Paine is a renowned atheist; George Washington despised him for that, and so did the American people. Benjamin Franklin became our nation’s Judas Iscariot, spending the last decade or so of his life consorting with French maidens like that strumpet whose video I posted a while back. He stopped being an American, and became a Frenchman; his views shifted accordingly.

    As for the rest:

    “…an amendment [to the constitution] was proposed by inserting the words, ‘Jesus Christ…the holy author of our religion,’ which was rejected ‘By a great majority in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of its protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and the Mohammedan, the Hindoo and the Infidel of every denomination.’”

    The mantle of the protection is Jesus Christ. The sentence makes that very clear.

    “The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as his father, in the womb of a virgin, will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter.”

    He was prophetic; we live in such an unGodly time. Jesus prophecied it too: “For if they do these things in a green tree, what shall be done in the brown?”

    “Reason and persuasion are the only practicable instruments.”

    That’s why the Bible appeals to them. Jefferson knew that.

    “I have examined all the known superstitions of the world, and I do not find in our particular superstition of Christianity one redeeming feature. They are all alike founded on fables and mythology. Millions of innocent men, women and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined and imprisoned. What has been the effect of this coercion? To make one half of the world fools and the other half hypocrites; to support roguery and error all over the earth.”

    That remark is taken our of context.

    “Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.”

    That’s why He wants reasoning men to read the Bible, accept it, and come to Him. Atheists and other dogmatic sinners are incapable of laying down their pride, and practicing true Reason.

    “Twenty times in the course of my late reading, have I been upon the point of breaking out, ‘this would be the best of all possible worlds, if there were no religion in it.’”

    Yet he never said it. He never crossed the line. Distinctions like that make all the difference.

    “The government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion.”

    No, but the laws and the traditions are. He’s right; the government is founded on laws. Those laws are what’s founded on religion, not the government itself. In context, that’s what he was trying to make clear.

    “Religion and government will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together.”

    This is why he wanted us to mix them. Adams knew as well as anyone else that unadulterated government is secularism; that’s the worst thing ever. It’s like having President Stalin. Contrarily, religion ungoverned leads to Unitarianism, and a bunch of whacked-out Gore family members having peyote rituals in their Prius. Religion requires governance, and government requires religion; separating them keeps them too pure, and thus too dangerous. I quite agree with President Adams.

    “There is nothing which can better deserve our patronage than the promotion of science…”

    He was referring to Christian science. The only True science known to man.

    “I beg you be persuaded that no one would be more zealous than myself to establish effectual barriers against the horrors of spiritual tyranny, and every species of religious persecution.”

    He didn’t want Christians persecuted. That’s what he meant. He was trying to keep atheists and Frenchies like Paine and Franklin from sending the rest of us to gulags. That much is quite clear, in context.

    So far, you haven’t given me anything to disagree with, Salmo. Most of these statements buttress my own. What’s your point?

    Comment by Sisyphus — July 5, 2007 @ 8:45 am | Reply

  30. “Christian science”

    Definition of an oxymoron, a contradiction in terms, as well as being exceedingly funny. Thanks Sisyphus, you made my day.

    Comment by Tyler Durden — July 5, 2007 @ 10:34 am | Reply

  31. How ’bout….Science is Man’s way of putting God’s processes into words?🙂 God has to have a way to make everything work (Physics, Biology, Chemistry, Medicine…..), and the study of that is Science. For a Christian, one is studying what God set up and for an atheist, one is studying the world around them…either way, the same things can be accomplished. Of course, the divide is at the arguement over Intelligent design and Evolution…otherwise,………

    Comment by La Mona — July 5, 2007 @ 10:42 am | Reply

  32. “The mantle of the protection is Jesus Christ. The sentence makes that very clear.”

    No, the sentence makes it clear that they are talking about the constitution. Mantle of ‘its’ protection, not ‘His’.

    “He was prophetic; we live in such an unGodly time. Jesus prophecied it too: “For if they do these things in a green tree, what shall be done in the brown?””

    That’s fair. I cede that to you.

    “That’s why the Bible appeals to them. Jefferson knew that.”

    Ah, yes. I forgot you think that.

    “That remark is taken our of context.”

    I fail to see how it possibly could be.

    “That’s why He wants reasoning men to read the Bible, accept it, and come to Him. Atheists and other dogmatic sinners are incapable of laying down their pride, and practicing true Reason.”

    He said ‘question God’s existence’. I personally see no problem with reading and accepting the bible, but you yourself have made statements to the effect that questioning for a moment the existence of God and the truth of the bible is blasphemy, and condemns one to hell.

    “Yet he never said it. He never crossed the line. Distinctions like that make all the difference.”

    I suppose. But the fact that he found religion detestable remains.

    “No, but the laws and the traditions are. He’s right; the government is founded on laws. Those laws are what’s founded on religion, not the government itself. In context, that’s what he was trying to make clear.”

    Not at all. He said not IN ANY SENSE founded on the Christian religion. If it was founded on laws that were founded on religion, that would certainly be in some sense.

    “This is why he wanted us to mix them.”

    I really don’t think that someone saying that religion and government being mixed would muddle and damage both is making an argument for mixing them.

    “He was referring to Christian science. The only True science known to man.”

    I think he was referring to actual science. The full quote mentions literature, as well, so he was clearly talking about intellectual pursuits.

    “He didn’t want Christians persecuted. That’s what he meant.”

    EVERY species of religious persecution.

    “So far, you haven’t given me anything to disagree with, Salmo. Most of these statements buttress my own. What’s your point?”

    Well, if President Adams wasn’t clear enough the first time around, how about this one…

    “It will never be pretended that any persons [forming the U.S. government] had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.”

    Yes it will be pretended, Mr. President. 231 years later.

    Comment by Salmo — July 5, 2007 @ 11:02 am | Reply

  33. The overwhelming reaction in the States is to keep church and government separate. That is pure democracy at work: giving the people what they ask for.

    Comment by Adam Nelson — July 6, 2007 @ 7:34 am | Reply


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