Blogs 4 Brownback

June 5, 2007

Come Visit the Creation Museum!

Filed under: Entertainment,Faith,Family,Science — Sisyphus @ 5:07 am

Looking for something fun to do with your family this summer? Take them to see a true science museum, the Creation Museum! Prepare to believe.

The Creation Museum will be upfront that the Bible is the supreme authority in all matters of faith and practice, and in every area it touches upon.

We’ll begin the Museum experience by showing that “facts” don’t speak for themselves (click here for a proposed drawing of this exhibit). There aren’t separate sets of “evidences” for evolution and creation—we all deal with the same evidence (we all live on the same earth, have the same fossils, observe the same animals, etc.). The difference lies in how we interpret what we study. We’ll then explore why the Bible—the “history book of the universe”—provides a reliable, eye-witness account of the beginning of all things.

After that, we’ll take guests on a journey through a visual presentation of the history of the world, based on the “7 C’s of History”: Creation, Corruption, Catastrophe, Confusion, Christ, Cross, Consummation. Throughout this family-friendly experience, guests will learn how to answer the attacks on the Bible’s authority in geology, biology, anthropology, cosmology, etc., and they will discover how science actually confirms biblical history.

If I lived in the Cincinnatti area, I would’ve gone to see it already. Sadly, financial obligations and distance prevent me and the family from checking it out this summer. The next chance I get to visit Ohio, though, this is the top item on my itinerary.

Their website is actually very informative, as well. It has numerous links for cosmology, although they seem to have fallen for the globalist delusions of Ptolemy and may require revision.

Still, a few minor and common scientific errors are far preferable to the kind of nonsense you’ll find in the Darwinist museums this summer. Those idiots are teaching their children about how unicorns and dragons walked the Earth.

The world is full of stories about brave heroes, magical events and fantastic beings. For thousands of years, humans everywhere—sometimes inspired by living animals or even fossils—have brought mythic creatures to life in stories, songs and works of art. Today these creatures, from the powerful dragon to the soaring phoenix, continue to thrill, terrify, entertain and inspire us.

We seem to catch glimpses of these creatures all around us: hiding beneath the ocean waves, running silently through the forest and soaring among the clouds. Some symbolize danger. Others, we think, can bring us luck or joy. Together mythic creatures give shape to humankind’s greatest hopes, fears and most passionate dreams.

If you’re going to waste $15 for a ticket to see this kind of rot, go buy a DVD of “Lord of the Rings” instead. At least then you’ll be entertained, and you won’t have to rub elbows with a bunch of snotty upper-middle-class New Yorkers who think their dragon stories have greater scientific validity than your Bible.

Better yet, go see the Creation Museum! If you make it out there, I want a full report on how it is. I can’t wait to check it out!

UPDATE: Looking for work? The museum is hiring! Not so fast, though, treefrogs! You have to agree to the Statement of Faith.

The scientific aspects of creation are important, but are secondary in importance to the proclamation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
The doctrines of Creator and Creation cannot ultimately be divorced from the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Basically, it helps to keep loons like you out from the business. You’d scare the children if you started telling them how your grandpa was a monkey.

49 Comments »

  1. Now I’m convinced this is a parody site. Either that, or a site run by 8 year olds.

    Comment by St. Legalize — June 5, 2007 @ 7:10 am | Reply

  2. Is it legal to discriminate against an employee on the grounds of religion? What would the founding fathers have said?

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 7:38 am | Reply

  3. “Is it legal to discriminate against an employee on the grounds of religion? What would the founding fathers have said?”

    In this case, probably no, given that the organization is a religious one. However, if one wanted to work in a capacity that did not require religious knowledge or instruction, i.e. a maintenance or clerical position, the Civil Rights Act would prohibit such discrimination. You can’t make your secretary take a religious oath.

    As for the Founding Fathers, they’d be saying, “Jesus Christ, we should have gone to Canada instead.”

    Comment by St. Legalize — June 5, 2007 @ 8:09 am | Reply

  4. I think this museum is excellent! My husband and I are going to visit there next month. I’ll send you an email and let you know how it is, Sisyphus!

    Comment by Marcia P. — June 5, 2007 @ 9:01 am | Reply

  5. Take pictures for the rest of us, Marcia P.

    Comment by DPS — June 5, 2007 @ 9:05 am | Reply

  6. I read about this museum a couple weeks ago. It sounds like it should be something that lots of people will enjoy, not just those who favor ID or creation science.

    To me, the debate about evolution versus creation science and ID is a complex one and I probably wouldn’t use quite the tone that you do, Sisyphus. This museum should stimulate debate, which is what all museums are meant to do.

    Comment by relee — June 5, 2007 @ 9:10 am | Reply

  7. The bottom line is that Darwinism leads to Communism, relee. I’ll send you some links on the subject, but it’s really as simple as that. Karl Marx was a Darwinist, Stalin was a Darwinist, and the doctrine of Socialism is a form of social Darwinism.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 9:43 am | Reply

  8. You’re getting mixed up again Sysiphus.

    Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production

    Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community.

    Darwinism is a term for the underlying theory in those ideas of Charles Darwin concerning evolution and natural selection. Discussions of Darwinism usually focus on evolution by natural selection, but sometimes Darwinism is taken to mean evolution more broadly, or other ideas not directly associated with the work of Darwin.

    While communism and socialism are related you can clearly see that the only thing that Darwinism has to do with either is the last three letters. i.e. “ism”

    I hope that this clears things up for you a little.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 9:54 am | Reply

  9. “Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production”

    “A society of human ants.

    Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community.”

    A society half-ant, half-man.

    “Darwinism is a term for the underlying theory in those ideas of Charles Darwin concerning evolution and natural selection. Discussions of Darwinism usually focus on evolution by natural selection, but sometimes Darwinism is taken to mean evolution more broadly, or other ideas not directly associated with the work of Darwin.”

    Darwinists and Marxists share envisionment of the anthill as the highest human ideal. Darwin himself was obsessed with ants.

    “While communism and socialism are related you can clearly see that the only thing that Darwinism has to do with either is the last three letters. i.e. “ism”

    I think we’ve proven quite the opposite, actually.

    “I hope that this clears things up for you a little.”

    Well, between your comments and my clarification of your comments, the casual reader now has a better shot at understanding the interplay between Darwinism, Marxism, Socialism, and the hive mentality. Thank you.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 10:06 am | Reply

  10. You are most welcome. Hopefully people will read the definitions and your non-sequitur responses and make up their own minds.

    How does Nietzsche come into your structure of political, sociological and misunderstood science?

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 10:13 am | Reply

  11. shorter hoverfrog:

    Everybody, look at me! I am block captain in my local nerd patrol!

    Comment by DPS — June 5, 2007 @ 10:18 am | Reply

  12. *sigh*
    I was wondering when the insults would start. Clearly when a concept is beyond your understanding you resort to name calling rather than attempt a reasoned debate. If you don’t have anything to contribute then why not sit this one out and read a book. I can recommend several that we written in the last thousand years or two that would be quite beneficial. Maybe you would like to start with Dr. Seuss or do you only read the King James’ Bible?

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 10:26 am | Reply

  13. “How does Nietzsche come into your structure of political, sociological and misunderstood science?”

    He was an atheist kook suffering from tertiary stages of syphilis. Why?

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 10:43 am | Reply

  14. The vast majority of his works were written before his mental breakdown and are very challenging works. You should read them, it may make you re-evaluate some of your opinions.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 11:01 am | Reply

  15. “The bottom line is that Darwinism leads to Communism”

    Jesus leads to crusades and Jihads

    Comment by Skeptic — June 5, 2007 @ 11:19 am | Reply

  16. “The vast majority of his works were written before his mental breakdown and are very challenging works. You should read them, it may make you re-evaluate some of your opinions.”

    What makes you think I haven’t read him? They made me slog through him extensively in college. I’ve read Beyond Good and Evil; The Birth of Tragedy; Ecce Homo; Twilight of the Idols; Contra Wagner; The Genealogy of Morals; and extensive sections of Thus Spake Zarathustra, Thoughts Out Of Season, and The Gay Science.

    The man was suffering from syphilis. He also wrote in as deliberately obscure a fashion as possible, so as to ensure that only those who read tons of him could understand him. As humor writing, it’s great stuff; as a substitute for Christianity, it’s disastrous.

    “Jesus leads to crusades and Jihads”

    What do you have against crusades? Why do you hate Christendom?

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 11:32 am | Reply

  17. Forgive me Sysyphus, I didn’t think that you’d been to college. I’d read that you were home schooled and foolishly assumed that this was the limit of your education. Anyway the point of reading Nietzsche (or any philosopher) is not to replace one ideology with another but to expand your available opinions so that you are more capable of deciding for yourself what is truth and what is false and, in many cases, what is somewhere in between.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 11:40 am | Reply

  18. Aren’t crusades inherently unpleasant? One side forcing an ideaology on an unwilling party. Doesn’t sound good to me.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 11:41 am | Reply

  19. “Forgive me Sysyphus, I didn’t think that you’d been to college. I’d read that you were home schooled and foolishly assumed that this was the limit of your education.”

    No, I kept going. College is a cesspool of sin and depravity, but some of the books they make you read are worth the price of admission. Getting to read St. Augustine’s “Confessions” was worth every minute they made me squander on Nietzsche.

    “Anyway the point of reading Nietzsche (or any philosopher) is not to replace one ideology with another but to expand your available opinions so that you are more capable of deciding for yourself what is truth and what is false and, in many cases, what is somewhere in between.”

    True. I would encourage everyone in college to read Nietzsche and Marx and Darwin, just as I would then encourage them to reject these atheist loons.

    “Aren’t crusades inherently unpleasant? One side forcing an ideaology on an unwilling party. Doesn’t sound good to me.”

    Without them, Spain and the Balkans would be Muslim right now. The Baltics would still be sacrificing virgins, and the Mayans would still be cutting hearts out. They’re not pleasant, but sometimes they’re necessary.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 11:46 am | Reply

  20. At least we agree that people should be well read. I’d also encourage people to read St. Augustine if only to reject the deeply religious undertones of ever pronouncement.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 5, 2007 @ 11:52 am | Reply

  21. “At least we agree that people should be well read. I’d also encourage people to read St. Augustine if only to reject the deeply religious undertones of ever pronouncement.”

    That would be a foolish way to read him, but
    I suppose I can’t stop one from choosing damnation over salvation. Just means more room in Heaven for the rest of us, I guess.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 12:24 pm | Reply

  22. Sissypuss, I agree completely. All of these syphilis infected losers who deny the glory of Christ need to be sent on a crusade against the greatest evil of our time: the damm French!

    We can ship all of these left-wing drug-addled perverts to France and then bomb the crap out of them.

    Since they’re all going to Hell they won’t take up any space in Heaven that’s for sure.

    Comment by Joe Blow — June 5, 2007 @ 12:43 pm | Reply

  23. Amen, Joe Blow. Amen.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 1:24 pm | Reply

  24. “What do you have against crusades?”

    The same thing I’ve got against Jihads

    Comment by Skeptic — June 5, 2007 @ 2:24 pm | Reply

  25. It’s jolly good to see that creationist museums are so popular all over the world. We sometimes have to deal with the anger of poor, unhappy youths who don’t let Jesus Christ Our Saviour into their hearts. Why they refuse the listen to the Voice of God escapes me. Will you please pray with me that we will be able to reach out to them and show them the Truth in the name of the Godhead, the Triune-God, the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. Please also pass on the message that they are not alone.

    Comment by Creationist England — June 5, 2007 @ 2:27 pm | Reply

  26. Sisyphus, I see those pesky atheists, helioleftists and assorted rationalists are once again infesting your comment boards with their so-called “objective truths” and “logical arguments.” If you need a break from battling for their everlovin’ souls, I’d suggest you check out this blog:

    http://baraminology.blogspot.com/

    It’s run by real Christians (no doubt Brownback fans!) devoted to the hard Biblical sciences. I’m sure you’ll find it very informative and chock full of useful information. For example, did you know that Kangaroos (and presumably all their other marsupial cousins in Australia) surfed to that fair isle on mats of vegetation after The Great Flood. I mean that’s not something these atheist biologists and their communist zoologist brethren would ever tell you.

    Comment by Everett Volk — June 5, 2007 @ 3:16 pm | Reply

  27. “It’s jolly good to see that creationist museums are so popular all over the world. We sometimes have to deal with the anger of poor, unhappy youths who don’t let Jesus Christ Our Saviour into their hearts. Why they refuse the listen to the Voice of God escapes me.”

    People like that are always a problem.

    “Will you please pray with me that we will be able to reach out to them and show them the Truth in the name of the Godhead, the Triune-God, the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. Please also pass on the message that they are not alone.”

    Amen.

    “It’s run by real Christians (no doubt Brownback fans!) devoted to the hard Biblical sciences. I’m sure you’ll find it very informative and chock full of useful information. For example, did you know that Kangaroos (and presumably all their other marsupial cousins in Australia) surfed to that fair isle on mats of vegetation after The Great Flood. I mean that’s not something these atheist biologists and their communist zoologist brethren would ever tell you.”

    Thanks for the link, Everett. I didn’t know that, but it makes perfect sense. Darwinist biologists obviously haven’t been doing their homework.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 5, 2007 @ 3:39 pm | Reply

  28. So you say you’ve been to college, yet you obviously don’t understand the meaning of mythological.

    “Still, a few minor and common scientific errors are far preferable to the kind of nonsense you’ll find in the Darwinist museums this summer. Those idiots are teaching their children about how unicorns and dragons walked the Earth.”

    The link you provided is an exhibit about mythological creatures. You know, like Big Foot, Nessie, The Flying Spaghetti Monster, etc. They never existed. They never will, they are made up in stories. Then again you believe in the greatest myth ever…

    Comment by Dave — June 5, 2007 @ 9:06 pm | Reply

  29. Dave, you atheists are all the same. I’ll bet you don’t even believe in pirates. But when they knock down your door at 2am in the morning, kidnap your midget homosexual lover and run off with your copy of ‘The Origin of the Species’ without so much as a ‘arrrgggh, by your leave?’, you’ll be praying to the FSM just like the rest of us.

    As one who’s personally felt the touch of His Noodly Appendage, I pity you.

    Comment by Pastor Sauce — June 6, 2007 @ 9:03 am | Reply

  30. Pastor Sauce @ 29:

    We know about you and your “Flying Spaghetti Monster” nonsense. Take your buffoonery elsewhere.

    Comment by DPS — June 6, 2007 @ 10:20 am | Reply

  31. “So you say you’ve been to college, yet you obviously don’t understand the meaning of mythological.”

    The “missing link” definitely qualifies.

    “The link you provided is an exhibit about mythological creatures. You know, like Big Foot, Nessie, The Flying Spaghetti Monster, etc. They never existed. They never will, they are made up in stories.”

    And your moonbat museums celebrate them. Who’s being delusional, here?

    “Then again you believe in the greatest myth ever…”

    Why do you hate God?

    “Dave, you atheists are all the same. I’ll bet you don’t even believe in pirates.”

    You sound like a heretic to me, Pastor.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 6, 2007 @ 10:24 am | Reply

  32. Brother Sisyphus, I think you may be skirting dangerously close to antiunicornalist and antidragonist heresies. In His Holy And Immutable Word, God tells us that, far from being nonsense, these creatures once walked the Earth and will walk the Earth again. Off the top of my head:

    Revelation 12:3
    And there appeared another wonder in heaven; and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads.

    Isaiah 34:7
    And the unicorns shall come down with them, and the bullocks with the bulls; and their land shall be soaked with blood, and their dust made fat with fatness.

    Far be a from me — a mere woman, after all — to instruct you in the ways of worship; but I fear that your soul may be teetering on a precipice. A few extra hours in the prayer closet could do you an eternity of good.

    Comment by Virginia Templeton — June 6, 2007 @ 4:48 pm | Reply

  33. Virginia Templeton @ 32:

    “these creatures once walked the Earth and will walk the Earth again.”

    We’re OK; it’s all prophecy. The past tense in Revelation describes what John saw in his vision of the future. But these monsters will walk the Earth again, to be sure. And their walking will be terrible to behold.

    We could all probably stand to buckle down for a few hours of good hard praying anyway, though.

    Comment by DPS — June 6, 2007 @ 11:51 pm | Reply

  34. Cool, I think dragons are great and my daughter loves them. Can you please give a date and time for the appearance of seven headed, ten horned, red dragons wearing crowns. I wouldn’t want to miss it.

    I’m not so sure about the unicorns though. I mean horses bite a lot anyway, how vicious would they be if you plonked a huge great scimitar on their heads as well. It doesn’t bear thinking about.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 7, 2007 @ 3:29 am | Reply

  35. The future existence of unicorns and dragons is undeniable; to posit them as existing in pre-Noah times is as un-Christian as to argue that the Messiah was, for argument’s sake, King David.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 7, 2007 @ 4:41 am | Reply

  36. “The future existence of unicorns and dragons is undeniable”
    How would such creatures come about though Sisyphus? Surely not by the heathen leftist heliocentric commie doctrine of evolution?

    Also how do you make dust fat with fatness exactly? The meaning of the phrase escapes me except as a metaphor. As you’ve explained many times nothing in the bible is metaphoric but must be read literally. Does this mean that dust is a living organism capable of absorbing blood and fat in order to grow larger and multiply?

    I’d often wondered why the top of my book shelves always got dusty despite cleaning the mess up every few days. The biblical explanation now seems obvious.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 7, 2007 @ 4:53 am | Reply

  37. On the subject of dust I can see how this is possible to prove. Simply collect some dust in a dish and add some blood. We should be able to see the dust engorge itself (themselves) and grow larger.

    Maybe this is the way that dragons will emerge. A large pile of dust soaked in blood cold form dragons in the right conditions. I wonder why no one has tried to create them. Surely godless scientists could find a use for dragons, perhaps in destroying right thinking Christians who want to reveal photographs of the edge of the world…or perhaps in contruction of secret underground bases.

    I don’t know, this is pure conjecture of course. All I know is that my daughter (who loves dragons) will be thrilled to bits that we can create our own dragons using common household dust and blood. I’ll let you know how it goes.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 7, 2007 @ 4:58 am | Reply

  38. “How would such creatures come about though Sisyphus? Surely not by the heathen leftist heliocentric commie doctrine of evolution?”

    God could create them, just as He created the rest of life on Earth in six days.

    “Does this mean that dust is a living organism capable of absorbing blood and fat in order to grow larger and multiply?”

    Some dust probably is; we’re made of dust, after all. But also, the fat particles could get in the air and cloy to the dust. And the dust could get fat that way.

    “I’d often wondered why the top of my book shelves always got dusty despite cleaning the mess up every few days. The biblical explanation now seems obvious.”

    Does this mean you’ll be converting now?

    “On the subject of dust I can see how this is possible to prove. Simply collect some dust in a dish and add some blood. We should be able to see the dust engorge itself (themselves) and grow larger.”

    Only if God wills it.

    “Maybe this is the way that dragons will emerge. A large pile of dust soaked in blood cold form dragons in the right conditions. I wonder why no one has tried to create them. Surely godless scientists could find a use for dragons, perhaps in destroying right thinking Christians who want to reveal photographs of the edge of the world…or perhaps in contruction of secret underground bases.”

    God would never allow such people to make dragons.

    “I don’t know, this is pure conjecture of course. All I know is that my daughter (who loves dragons) will be thrilled to bits that we can create our own dragons using common household dust and blood. I’ll let you know how it goes.”

    I don’t think she’d want an evil dragon in practice. The first thing it would do would be to kill your entire family and burn your village, neighborhood or township to the ground.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 7, 2007 @ 5:11 am | Reply

  39. I’m pretty sure that any dragon created by my daughter wouldn’t be evil. She has a very sweet disposition and inquisitive mind. No, any dragon made with her fair hand would undoubtedly be magnificent and would only destroy families, villages, neighbourhoods and townships of people who were awfully horrid.

    Anyway, that’s for the weekend. Onto the creation of unicorns, if I may. Are they simply horses with a horn sticking out of their heads as popular culture depicts them or are they something else? If the former wouldn’t it be possible to create a unicorn using a horn, a horn and some duct tape? Would this perhaps herald the end of days? I’m not so keen on unicorns as I am on dragons, they seem to be little more than a cheap trick.

    Dragons rock though.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 7, 2007 @ 8:57 am | Reply

  40. We’ll then explore why the Bible—the “history book of the universe”—provides a reliable, eye-witness account of the beginning of all things.

    Men wrote the Bible. God was supposedly alone when he supposedly created the universe. So how does the Bible provide an eye-witness account? Enlighten me, Sisyphus.

    Comment by The Skepticist — June 7, 2007 @ 1:04 pm | Reply

  41. “I’m pretty sure that any dragon created by my daughter wouldn’t be evil. She has a very sweet disposition and inquisitive mind. No, any dragon made with her fair hand would undoubtedly be magnificent and would only destroy families, villages, neighbourhoods and townships of people who were awfully horrid.”

    I think you need to read the Bible a little bit more carefully before attempting to conjure such a creature.

    “Men wrote the Bible. God was supposedly alone when he supposedly created the universe. So how does the Bible provide an eye-witness account? Enlighten me, Sisyphus.”

    He told men what He did, and they wrote it down for Him. If they screwed with it or messed up, He smote them. So they knew they had to be very, very accurate.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 7, 2007 @ 1:34 pm | Reply

  42. “I think you need to read the Bible a little bit more carefully before attempting to conjure such a creature.”
    Does the Bible have step by step instructions for creating dragons? I’ve been missing out.

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 7, 2007 @ 2:26 pm | Reply

  43. The fact that Sisyphus chose a name from Roman mythology is very troubling to me. As a Christian I am affronted by people who lend credence to idolatry (after all, Romans not only presided over the killing of the Christ, but they worshiped idols and put their g_ds above the one true L-rd.)

    When the tribulations begin, I think G_d will smite sisyphus for this. Just as he smote those who deviated from the truth even one iota from the true happenings that he told them.

    I think G_d should smite all of you for making fun of sisyphus. Just as he should smite those who complain about neighbors burning bulls as sacrifice. After all, is not the smell of charred bull-flesh pleasing to the lord?

    Also, since hoverfrog does not know the true instructions for conjuring dragons (from dust and fat I believe) he/she clearly has not immersed himself/herself in the one true word of our Jeebus

    Comment by Paul — June 8, 2007 @ 10:46 am | Reply

  44. I understand the museum was built in six days.

    Comment by i_capricorn — June 8, 2007 @ 1:30 pm | Reply

  45. “Does the Bible have step by step instructions for creating dragons? I’ve been missing out.”

    Worshipping Satan seems to be a necessary step. I can’t help you there, I’m afraid.

    “The fact that Sisyphus chose a name from Roman mythology is very troubling to me. As a Christian I am affronted by people who lend credence to idolatry (after all, Romans not only presided over the killing of the Christ, but they worshiped idols and put their g_ds above the one true L-rd.)”

    It’s from Greek mythology, and he was basically an early Christian. He was punished for defying the Pagan gods. In my opinion, he was waiting for Jesus.

    “I understand the museum was built in six days.”

    Really?

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 8, 2007 @ 1:39 pm | Reply

  46. “Worshipping Satan seems to be a necessary step. I can’t help you there, I’m afraid.”
    You’re saying that worshipping Satan will allow me to manufacture dragons from dust and blood? That sounds easy. Surely all scientists are secretly worshippers of Satan though. You’ve explained that Darwin, Einstein, Galileo, Newton and many others were all left wing, devil worshipping, soy eating, leather clad tail gunners who ate babies and suffered from venereal diseases. Surely someone would have tried to make dragons by now. I mean if I thought that the devil was anything more than a silly story to frighten superstitious people then I’d certainly be building dragons.

    Dragons rock!

    Comment by hoverfrog — June 8, 2007 @ 6:18 pm | Reply

  47. “Surely someone would have tried to make dragons by now. I mean if I thought that the devil was anything more than a silly story to frighten superstitious people then I’d certainly be building dragons.”

    I can’t help you in these Satanist endeavours.

    Comment by Sisyphus — June 8, 2007 @ 7:29 pm | Reply

  48. Why pay $20, if I can go here for free entertainment?

    Comment by Skeptic — June 9, 2007 @ 11:16 am | Reply

  49. Why didn’t Noa save the dinosaurs? Wasn’t he instructed to get two of EVERY animal? Shouldn’t he have been murdered by god for not following his will?

    Comment by Pastafarian — June 27, 2007 @ 12:35 pm | Reply


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